I’m currently working on book three of my first trilogy and I’ve discovered some interesting things. There are definitely positive aspects to writing a trilogy or a series, but yes, there are also some downsides. I wondered if anyone else had similar observations, but I couldn’t really find any other articles at all about writing trilogies. So, I decided to do this blog post for anyone else out there planning to tackle writing a trilogy, or for people who are interested in learning more about the process behind the scenes.

I’d like to end this article on a positive note, so let’s begin with the bad stuff, shall we?

The Bad Part about Writing a Trilogy

The first book in my Darkness Trilogy has been out for over a year now, and the second book’s release was almost three months ago, so I’ve received a good number of ratings and reviews. Overall, readers seem to enjoy my books, but of course, you can’t please everyone and there has been negative feedback as well. So here’s the biggest problem: there are a couple of things in particular that people didn’t like, but I can’t change those things without losing consistency throughout the series.

For example, I wrote the story from three alternating points of view, which many people liked, but others hated. I got the idea from Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series because I loved how she did it. I thought, “If I ever write a book, I’m doing that!” So, I did, not realizing how many people would be turned off by it. But it wouldn’t make any sense to write book three from a completely different point of view, would it? So I’m stuck with it.

Also, people seem to have a huge problem with the “giant” three and a half year age gap between my two main characters. Well, I can’t exactly make them magically the same age in book three now, can I?

So what’s the solution? I think you can avoid some problems by playing it safe, for example, I’ve made the two characters in my next series that become romantically involved the exact same age. However, if you play everything safe, your book will probably end up being unoriginal and boring. I’ve decided to write my next book in a first person, present tense point of view, despite knowing some people don’t like that writing style. It’s what I want to do though, and I accept that I will be criticized for it. Receiving criticism is an unfortunate part of being an author.

The Good Part about Writing a Trilogy

Okay, it’s not all bad, but I feel better having vented a little bit, ahhhh. On to the positives!

I’m not a professional cover artist, but I have done some graphic design, and creating the cover for books two and three in a trilogy has to be easier than for book one. You already have your basic colour scheme and fonts chosen, and in keeping the look consistent, you don’t have to come up with too many new ideas.

Speaking of consistency, you already have your basic cast of characters and you’ve defined the world within your book. It feels good slipping into the universe you’ve created, like snuggling under a familiar blanket. Writing about your tried and true characters feels like visiting old friends.

Here’s a big plus side to writing a trilogy: people like reading trilogies! They enjoy reacquainting themselves with your world and its characters too. It can be tough to keep a series of several books interesting and new, but a trilogy is the perfect length for a balance between familiarity and freshness.

The Coolest Part of All

I know quite a few people who say they’d like to write a book, and they’ve written some stuff, but never finished an entire book. Well, when I finish writing book three of my trilogy, I’ll be able to say, “I wrote a trilogy!” Not everyone will like my trilogy, but I’m okay with that. I’m driven to write, and if you are too, then don’t let anything stop you. Overall, writing a trilogy has been a great experience for me. I only ask one thing: if you read my books and hate the three and a half year age gap between my characters, can you just…not mention it to me? ;)